On Tuesday, I posted a new painting, “Side Street”, which began as demonstration painting  The post is long and covers the composition and color choices made while painting the demo.  What was left out of that post was any discussion on another question that came up during the demo and which I have been thinking about since.  One of the ladies watching the demo asked why I placed such a large shade area at the bottom of the painting, where one visually “enters” the painting.  At the time I offered the answer that the large dark and the smaller patches of shadow further up or, visually speaking, back in the pictoral space act as compositional stepping stones leading the eye to the main focal point.  The answer is true as far as it goes.  The question stuck with me after the demo was over, as it occurred to me that many of my paintings feature the same sort of composition.  In looking over images since having heard the question, I have found a number of recent works and older works with the same sort of compositional treatment.  “Equinox Road” , shown below is a recent work that has been a successful showpiece.

"Equinox Road" - watercolor Landscape by Vermont artist Tony Conner

“Equinox Road”

This painting was posted shortly after it was completed in April 2008.  In that post, I talk about this work being metaphorical and composed just to communicate the way I sense the change of season between winter and spring – more about this painting can be found here.  A large cool shadow area covers most of the bottom third of the painting. Below are some other newer and older works that feature similar compositions.

Deep Autumn - watercolor landscape painting by Vermont artist Tony Conner

“Deep Autumn”

"Winter Light" - watercolor landscape painting by Vermont artist Tony Conner

“Winter Light”

"Cape Time" - watercolor landscape painting by Vermont artist Tony Conner

“Cape Time”

"October Blues" - watercolor landscape painting by Vermont artist Tony Conner

“October Blues”

So, how come? Why does this compositional convention show up so often in my landscape paintings.  The answer I gave during the demo is true – it works well as a compositional tool.  Beyond that, I have an affinity for the play of light in nature.  In a painting, the only way to convey light is to contrast it with shadow or shade – meaning that there must be some variety of darker values near the lights.  As I alluded in the earlier post, and as I try hard to convey to students in my classes, the composition of value shapes is what provides structural strength (or weakness) to a painting.  Personally, I like a solid visual step at the bottom edge of a painting, which is the reason that I so often include it in my work.  What would Sigmund Freud think?  Something deep, dark and troubling no doubt!  I prefer to think it’s just my best efforts at good composition. That said, perhaps I’ll mix things up in work to come – stay tuned!

"Park-McCullough View" - watercolor landscape painting by Vermont artist Tony Conner

“Park-McCullough View”

"Breaking Light" - watercolor landscape painting by Vermont artist Tony Conner

“Breaking Light”

"Afternoon Farm" - watercolor landscape painting by Vermont artist Tony Conner

“Afternoon Farm”

"Golden Afternoon" - watercolor landscape painting by Vermont artist Tony Conner

“Golden Afternoon”

"Rural Route" - watercolor landscape painting by Vermont artist Tony Conner

“Rural Route”

Contact me if you have an interest in these or any other paintings on the site. Email me at tc@tonyconner.com or by phone at 802-375-5548.

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